Friday, March 21, 2014

Why Even Write? by Neil D. Ostroff


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Here are some reviews:

5.0 out of 5 stars Finished it yesterday and still reeling..., August 19, 2013
By 
Elly Michaels - See all my reviews
Amazon Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Drop Out (Kindle Edition)
Wow! My literature professors always said that a novel is praiseworthy if it inspires in the reader strong emotions, and Neil Ostroff's Drop Out certainly does that.
5.0 out of 5 stars Drop Out, July 29, 2013
By 
Dora Preston - See all my reviews
This review is from: Drop Out (Kindle Edition)
Ostroff hits a home run. Drop Out is a truly inspiring story of heartbreaking loss, survivor's guilt, and the healing power of unconditional love. I highly recommend this book.
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the most emotionally moving books I have ever read., July 28, 2013
By 
Mary Lou Transue - See all my reviews
Amazon Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Drop Out (Kindle Edition)
Since I am 82 years old I read this book rivited to the story line with so many deaths. I have had most of my friends pass and many with Hospice Care so I was attracted to learn what Hospice does to ease the end of life.

The book was fast reading and very very moving. In a way it was extremely spiritual and it made me realize
how lucky we all are for every breath we take and every day we live.

 Buy it and read it. You will not regret it.



WHY EVEN WRITE?
I've been doing the internet interview thing again and recently I was asked something that I hadn't been asked before. The questioned posed was; "What do you hope to achieve with your writing?"

I had to think about that one for a moment before I could offer a reasonable response. I'm actually not looking to achieve anything with my writing except to provide people with entertainment (an imaginary retreat from the real world). I'm not looking to win any big awards (though I'm not opposed). I don't think I'm going to get rich from this (though that would be nice). And I'm not looking at my writing as a way to meet women (I'm married). So why exactly am I constantly in front of my keyboard tapping until carpel tunnel kicks in?

Simple, I'm addicted to storytelling.

I describe my books as quick, exciting, thought-provoking, powerful reads, devoid of mind-numbingly boring character details, but characters that will forever haunt your memory. My plots are both uniquely insightful and yet jarring at the same time.

I don't think my books will ever hit the mainstream market but I could get a viral following of readers who want to experience the kinds of stories that stay with you long after finishing the final page. As one of my fans put it in an email to me; "I love your novels because I can read them in a few hours, which is good, because I can never put them down once I start one."

Such high praise pinks my cheeks. The freedom of an author to write any type of novel they want without worrying if a certain publisher will accept the material is amazing. I will NEVER have a publisher or agent tell me to rewrite a novel again.

In my early, exciting days as a New York-agent-represented author I had several publishers tell me to take out what I thought were some of the best parts of my novels because they felt the scenes wouldn't sell to the mainstream public. Well, guess what? I don't want to sell to the mainstream public. I want to sell to people who are interested in reading something they've never read before, something that may touch them deeply or maybe scare the h*ll out of them. No boring, conventional, formulaic, mainstream stories here. Just a crazy, obsessed, introverted author airing out the over-cluttered attic of his mind.




8 comments:

Laurie Buchanan said...

I enjoyed reading this interview. Most particularly, the author's response:

"I'm addicted to storytelling."

Leanne Dyck said...

Yes, I agree, Laurie. And I think its this addiction that leads many readers to write.

DA Cairns said...

Thanks for sharing this. I admire Neil for the fact that he seems to have found his place. I suspect that I, on the other hand, will continue to torture myself with dreams of mainstream success while knowing that I am not a mainstream kind of guy, and I don't write mainstream novels...apparently.

Leanne Dyck said...

I'm just beginning to navigate my way through my author career. But the more publishing houses I investigate the more diverse I realize they are. And I firmly believe that if you continue to write you will be published and you will be read. Only you can end your career. Keep the faith, DA. And thank you for your comment.

Dean K Miller said...

Neil has captured and cultivated the essence of today's writing frontier. The options are many, but I agree that staying true to one's writing path is the best way to find "success," no matter how (or who) that is defined.

Dean K Miller said...

Neil has captured and cultivated the essence of today's writing frontier. The options are many, but I agree that staying true to one's writing path is the best way to find "success," no matter how (or who) that is defined.

Leanne Dyck said...

I couldn't agree more, Dean. Thank you for your comment.

Neil Ostroff said...

Thanks Dean. It's been a long road with many twists and turns but I finally found peace knowing I've sold thousands of copies independently; this after having a NY agent four five years.